Falling Asleep Again, Always Wanted To, What Am I to Do, Can’t Do It

Falling asleep is sometimes difficult. I’m always looking for solutions to the problem.
When I was younger I’d have trouble sleeping if something important was supposed to happen the next day. Now that I’m older about the only thing that’s every “important the next day” is an early morning doctor’s appointment. Otherwise, any problem falling asleep seems to go in cycles for me. I’ll have many days, a week sometimes where I’ll be asleep minutes after my head hits the pillow. Then I’ll have a series of day where I’ll fall asleep but wake in the middle of the night and not be able to fall back asleep. There are also the times when for a few days, maybe a week, falling asleep will be difficult. I’ll toss and turn. The bed will feel uncomfortable. Any position I lie in will feel wrong. But the worst will be having a moment when I’m about to fall asleep, doze for a moment, but suddenly wake up. When that happens I know I’m not going to be sleeping for awhile.
Usually, when I can’t sleep I’ll lie there trying for about 20 minutes. Then I’ll get up. Sometimes I’ll exercise jumping jacks, sit-ups, and so on. Sometimes that does the trick. Sometimes it doesn’t. Often I’ll read until I feel drowsy. Sometimes that works, but more often I’ll be awake reading again about 20 minutes later. What works best is giving up. Almost always, after I’ve been awake, tossing turning, exercising, reading and the clock says something like, 3:30, I’ll say to myself something like, “Guess that’s it, I’m not sleeping tonight so I might as well give up trying.” Sometimes I start planning my now revised day that will start at 4 a.m., other times I’ll decide to plan to turn the computer on but lie there thinking about what I’m going to look at such as a TV show, a short story, or the sports news.
The funny thing is if I try that first at 2:30 a.m. after I woke up and couldn’t sleep or at 10 p.m. on the nights when I can’t sleep at all – it doesn’t work, probably because I haven’t really given up. When I try using it early, it becomes just another trying to sleep technique.
Today I found this list of “sure-fire” sleep aids from early modern Europe (the 15th and 16th centuries. Here are three you’ll want to try:
  1. Put some blood-sucking leeches behind your ears. When they bore holes in the skin, pull them out and place a grain of opium in each hole. (From 16th-century French physician André du Laurens.)
  2. Kill a sheep, and then press its steaming lungs on either side of the head. Keep the lungs in place as long as they remain warm. (From 16th-century French surgeon Ambroise Paré.)
  3. After the evening meal, eat lettuce, drink wine, and rub an ointment made of the oil of violets or camphor on the temples. Dissolve a mixture of poppy seeds, lettuce seeds, balsam, saffron, and sugar and cook it in poppy juice. Then listen to pleasant music and lie down on a bed covered with the leaves of fresh, cool plants. (From 15th-century philosopher Marsilio Ficino.)” — Benjamin Reiss, author of Wild Nights: How Taming Sleep Created Our Restless World

This is where I found those as well as a list of more serious, more likely, contemporary solutions: Busy Brain Not Letting You Sleep? 8 Experts Offer tips

Where Do You Get Your Ideas, etc…

Cormac McCarthy Has a Unique (and Tasty) Writing Process

This sounds a bit like the story Theodore Geisel, Dr. Seuss, told when someone asked him where he got his ideas: “I get all my ideas in Switzerland near the Furka Pass. There is a little town called Gletsch, and two thousand feet up above Gletsch there is a smaller hamlet called Über  Gletsch. I go there on the fourth of August every summer to get my cuckoo clock fixed. While the cuckoo is in the hospital, I wander around and talk to the people in the streets. They are very strange people, and I get my ideas from them.Cormac McCarthy

McCarthy doesn’t claim to travel to Switzerland for his inspiration, but perhaps he should consider such a trip.

Among Cormac McCarthy’s books are Blood Meridian (1985), For All the Pretty Horses, The Road, and No Country for Old Men. The famously reclusive McCarthy doesn’t talk much about his writing habits, but what he has said is fascinating. In an interview with Oprah Winfrey, McCarthy remarked: “I do most of my writing at breakfast. I name the eggs and pieces of toast and bacon after my characters, then I have them dance around on the plate while I do funny voices for each of them. Whatever character I eat last becomes the protagonist of the novel.” *

Did McCarthy really say that? I don’t know. I watched clips of his interview with Oprah and never heard that, but maybe it was in a clip I didn’t see. Then again, this is April 1st.

* Found in this article: 9 Mind-Blowing Facts about Your Favorite Books

 

Sleepy

Today is National Crayon Day. One of the crayons used to color the picture on the right is being retired (Dandelion).

This poem was not written for this day. It was written after reading a poem by William C. Williams. Still this poem fits this day.

 

SLEEPY

As the crayon
crawled over
the edge of

the paper
first the right
hand

carefully
then the chin
stepped down

into the pit of
the empty
space

How Much Would You Pay for This?

Here’s my question for today: How much would you pay for this? It’s a Cheeto. Just one, not the whole bag. It does have an unusual shape.Harambe Cheeto

Would you give someone $1 for it? Maybe $5 if someone else was going to buy it for a buck? Would you spend $100 for it? Can you imagine any scenario where someone would spend $500 for one Cheeto? It’s a Flaming Hot Cheeto, does that make a difference? 

“This item is one of a kind! It measures about 1 1/2 inches in length (it looks sooo much bigger in the picture),”

Well, would you believe me if I told you someone has offered $100,000 for this Cheeto?

Here’s the story: http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/news/harambe-cheeto-ebay-flamin-hot-cincinnati-zoo-dead-slain-gorilla-ape-tree-a7567241.html

 

Beth Dunn Inspired Me

I found this quite inspirational and the reason that I started jogging again. Yesterday I watched a video by HubSpot’s Beth Dunn about persistence. These are four pictures of Beth. She tried losing weight many times a number of different ways but wasn’t successful till she found a way to hold herself accountable. 

At the end of every jog, she took a selfie. Taking that selfie every day gave her an additional reason to continue jogging every day. 

As you can see from the pictures below it worked. The first picture was her before she started jogging in 2012. The next is about a year later on stage at the Inbound event where she is 75 lbs lighter. Next is a picture at the event the following year, then this past November.

We usually want change such as weight loss to be quick, but as you can see Beth’s weight loss wasn’t immediate, but with persistence, it became drastic, life-changing.

If I jog just about every day and take a selfie every day I see no reason the process shouldn’t work for me, too.

Beth’s video about persistence: ( https://youtu.be/S8Q3vnPM6kk )